Homeostasis
  • Homeostasis is the dynamic constancy of the internal environment, the maintenance of which is the principal function of physiological regulatory mechanisms. The concept of homeostasis provides a framework for understanding most physiological processes. (taken from Human Physiology, 11th Editon) Some examples of homeostasis would be maintaining heart rate, temperature of your body, breathing, and also glucose in your blood.

  • This is a picture of homeostasis and how it controls the temperature in your body. homeostasis.gif

  • There are two different types of feedback loops a positive and negative, and there is also a negative feedback inhibition.


-A positive feedback loop is the action of effectors amplifies those changes that stimulated the effectors. (taken from Human Physiology, 11th editon)

An example of a positive feedback loop is blood clotting after a cut. Blood clotting happens once the sensory for it has been triggered and the brain sends information to start blood clotting. Once blood clotting starts it sends information for more clotting factors.
-A negative feedback is the effectors are inhibited from producing more or less of their effecting actions. (taken from Human Physiology, 11th edition)

An example of a negative feedback loop is the thermometer in your house. It is set at a certain temperature, and if the heat or cold from outside makes the temp in your house rise or fall the air conditioner or heater will start to warm or cool it.body_temp.jpg


-A negative feedback inhibition is effectors are inhibited from producing more or less of their effecting actions. (taken from Human Physiology, 11th edition)

An example of a negative feedback inhibition is the maintenance of blood glucose in our blood. Insulin produces a lowering of blood glucose. Because a rise in blood glucose stimulates insulin secretion, a lowering of blood glucose caused by insulin’s action inhibits further insulin secretion. This close loop control system is called negative feedback inhibition. (taken from Human Physiology, 11th edition)
blood_glucose.jpg

-Homeostasis and Occupational Therapy
Homeostasis is very important not only in Occupational Thearpy, but in all medical fields. OTs and OTAs need to know how homeostasis works inside the body so they can accurately know what is going on with their client on the ouside of their body. OTs and OTAs can also be called homeostasis regulators to their client's bodies. The OTs job is to find out what is wrong with the client, make a treatment plan, and then put the treatment into action. Therefor, they can be called a homeostasis regulator for their client's bodies.

-Essential Question
Negative feedback is the activity of the effecros is influenced by the effects they produce, and because this regulation is in a negative direction it is known as a negative feedback loop. Insulin is controlled by a negative feedback inhibition because a rise in blood glucose stimulates insulin secretion, a lowering of blood glucose caused by insulin's action inhibits further insulin secretion. It is important for insulin and other molecules to be regulated because the brain uses blood glucose as its primary source of energy to entrust to the regulation of insulin. (taken from Human Physiology, 11th edition) If insulin wasn't regulated the brain would have no energy which then would effect the rest of the body and how it functions.